Tag Archives: triggers

What Matters Most in Your Life

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What Comes First in Your Life?

Do you  value love most? God is love. By putting God first, everything else will fall into place. We will best love and support ourselves, our family and our friends. By choosing love, we put God first. He is a light in the darkness, our helper in the storm. If we seek Him first, He will help us and show us how to love others and how to take care of ourselves.

God loves us more than we can imagine and only wants the best for us. God does not cause bad things to happen. We live in a lost and broken world plagued with darkness. The good news is that light has overcome the darkness. This is not our home. and as the song says, “We are just taking the long way home”  (Steven Curtis Chapman-lyrics) There is something better. God sees the whole story beginning to end and He has defeated death. We only need to have faith. We can never earn His love. We are all broken in our own way. No one is perfect and God doesn’t expect us to be.

However, He knows our heart and true motives. If we honestly pursue God first and want His will for our lives, He will use all things for good. That terrible heartache, health problem, broken relationship, addiction, or other struggle is nothing compared to the power of God. In order to use that power to be an overcomer, we must have faith and rely on God’s strength to pull us through. We will never make it on our own.

I am going though a really hard time right now. After a while with stable moods, my bipolar disorder  is causing major issues in my life. My previously helpful medication and treatment plan have not worked to push this mania away. It crept up over a year ago. There have been ups and downs, but for the most part I have been hypomanic. Stress and other triggers cause it to flare up. This is the case these last few weeks. I am battling anxiety, struggling to sleep, my mind is scattered, memory disabled, and thoughts are constantly racing.  Although I try to contain them, my words keep spilling out. I try to do what I know works. I set A schedule, try and get enough sleep, prioritize tasks, spend time with God, and avoid triggers such as caffine. If I suddenly get the urge to organize everything, I need to step back and think about my thinking. Why do I suddenly have a desire to do the chores I usually put off because I dislike them so much?

I know I need to put God first. They only way for me to get better is to rely on Him. He loves me and wants what is best for me. When my mind is scattered and I struggle to make good choices. God leads me along the right path and carries me when I am too week to walk.

God also helps me through others. My family loves and supports me. I try to listen to their advice and accept their help. Normally, I try  to do everything myself. Obviously that has not worked. I need to let go of my pride and take care of myself. I know I will come through this and be better for it. My pain serves A purpose and I will persevere!

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How Do We Put God

First, ask God to help you put him, ask him to help you see what to do, and to guide your steps

Have faith that God keep His promises. You are loved more than you know. You are forgiven through grace. Trust that He wants what is best for you and that if you rely on Him, you will overcome your struggles and find true joy.

Eliminating obstacles such as, desires for fortune and fame, work overload, addiction, or other temptations by confessing them to God.

In place of sin, struggle, and heartache, we are to rely fully on Christ. We do this by being accountable to a Godly friend, spending time in God’s Word and prayer every day, attending and becoming involved with church worship regularly, and listening to Godly music and messages are a few ways to put on Christ. A little bit of sin can add up to making provision for the flesh, so putting on Christ will add up to making provision for the Holy Spirit.

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Prayer: You are Holy, Lord. Thank you for the Blood of Jesus to wash us and cleanse us from sin. As a born again believer I ask You to help me to put off these things that hinder my life from being completely surrendered to You and show me the ways to put on Christ so that I may please You. Amen.

“Long Way Home”
by Steven Curtis Chapman | from the album re:creation

I set out on a great adventure
The day my Father started leading me home
Said theres gonna be mountians to climb
And valleys were gonna go through

But I had no way of knowing
Just how hard this journey could be
Cause the mountians are steeper
And the valleys are deeper than I ever would had dreamed

But I know were gonna make it
And I know were gonna get there soon
And I know sometimes it seems like, were going the wrong way
But its just the long way home

Some rocks on my shoes
Fears I wish I could lose
That make the mountians so hard to climb
And my heart gets so heavy with the weight of the world sometimes

There’s a bag of regrets,
Should’ve beens, and not yets
That keep on dragging around
And I can hardly wait till the day I get to lay them all down

I know that day is coming
I know its gonna be here soon
I won’t turn back even if the whole world says I’m going the wrong way
Cause its just the long way home

When we cant take another step
The Father will pick us up and carry us in His arms
And even on the best days, He says to remember were not home yet
So don’t get too comfortable
Cause we are just pilgrams passing through

I know that day is coming
I know were gonna be there soon
I keep on singing and believing
What all of my songs say

Cause our God has made a promise
And I know everything He says is true
He promised He would never ever leave us
He’s gonna lead us
He’ll lead us home

Every single step of the long way home
So keep on, were gonna make it
Were just taking the long way home
So keep on, were gonna make it
I know, were gonna make it
Its just the long way home

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What Causes the Urge to Pull

Here is another great blog post from Trichotillomania therapist and 20 year pull-free trichster, Claudia Miles (my role model).

As a psychotherapist who’s worked with hundreds of hair pullers, and as someone who personally suffered from daily hair pulling until I was 27 and has been pull free for 20 years, I know all too well the pain, shame and despair that pullers experience. I also know firsthand the frustration and hopelessness of trying *everything* to stop with no success. Or worse, having short-lived success–a day, a week, maybe even a month–and suddenly without warning you find yourself pulling again.

Maybe you pull your head hair, or your brows or lashes, or other body hair. My clients tend to be equally divided in that nearly half pull head hair and nearly half pull brows and/or lashes, a small number pull both, and the remainder pull from various areas on the body.

For those who don’t have Trich, also known as a “body focused repetitive disorder” (BFRD, and don’t understand it, but are close to someone who does, their own frustration and sadness about their child’s, friend’s, sibling’s or partner’s suffering may lead them to make constant suggestions (have you tried __ or ___), say to you, “Stop pulling, Honey,” if they see you do it, or try to “convince” you to stop by “reminding” you: “But Honey you have such pretty
hair..” “You don’t want to be bald, do you?” “Remember how upset you were about your lashes when you went to that dinner party, school dance, work, saw yourself in a picture, your friend asked you about it?”

As if you don’t already more desperately want to stop than anyone else could ever imagine. What’s hard to explain even to yourself is why you keep doing it, or why you do it at all. Why stopping seems so impossible when the behavior itself makes no sense. It just seems “crazy” or “gross” or you may feel “weak” and “pathetic”.

What others don’t know, and what you may not know, is that for people with Trich, hair pulling is a self-soothing mechanism (not an attempt to cause harm to yourself), and it feels pleasurable. It’s not an addiction to pain. The other even more important thing is that you are being prompted to pull by a physical urge that can best be compared to an itch. When people have an itch, they tend to respond to it without thinking or even being aware they are doing so. That’s why, if you have poison oak or chicken pox, you may not want to scratch, the doc may even say not to scratch, but the moment your attention is diverted (you’re watching TV or you’re on the phone), you “find yourself scratching.” And at that point, the need to “complete or finish” scratching is extremely compelling, even if you don’t want to. This comparison may help your spouse or parent or even you yourself to understand a little better what it is that causes you to start pulling in any particular moment. Either a physical or neurological urge occurs in a split second, as if you had an itch, and without conscious awareness you respond automatically. That’s why you may not have any idea of a precipitating factor.

Now, if it were that simple, it might well be easier to treat. But it’s important for pullers and their families to understand that this is not a willful behavior. Most people know what it’s like to respond to an itch and begin scratching, sometimes for a minute or more, before you realize what you’re doing. And most people also understand that, once you start scratching, poison oak for example, the craving to do so can overtake you, even though you know you shouldn’t. Most folks also know that, when at its itchiest, you may find yourself scratching, stop doing so, tell yourself, OK, I’m not going to scratch anymore, go back to
your movie, and find yourself scratching again and again. Imagine if this urge was daily and constant. Imagine if it resulted in hair loss. Yet no matter what you did, you would suddenly and repeatedly “find” yourself doing it. That’s, in short, what is happening to pullers. And because it as relieving to someone with Trich as it is for anyone to scratch an itch, you continue the behavior even when you’re aware. It is extremely important to understand that you (the puller) are not “crazy.” And anyone who experienced these urges, which occur in a microseconds, would respond the same way.

There are however, two other factors that come into play. I believe these urges have a cause that goes beyond that physical urge, and that are psyche comes to play a part in the constancy and intensity of these urges. Most people describe hair pulling as occurring in or even causing a “trance-like” state. This trance-like state kind of numbs one out emotionally, just like using a substance of some kind and also much like eating excessive amounts of carbs and sugar. This is why lots of people who have issues with weight may be engaging in what is called “emotional eating.” One may crave carbs and sugar in a way that feels like “regular” hunger. You may feel like you have to have a muffin or donut or cookie or hunk of sourdough bread. Yet underneath that craving, outside your present awareness, it may be fear or loneliness or shame that in a sense causes those cravings to happen. And once fulfilled, the emptiness or loneliness or shame is covered up.. Numbed out. So people tend to think that “their only problem is overeating.” Otherwise everything is fine. And this is exactly the same for hair pullers. The act of pulling numbs the longing or dis-ease, so it’s easy to believe that if I could just stop pulling, everything would be fine.

I work with people to get beneath this fallacy, generally dealing with issues like perfectionism, a lack of self love and self acceptance, or rather, a self-acceptance that is conditional. If they make a mistake, don’t finish their endless to do lists, aren’t thin enough, productive enough, accomplished enough or smart enough (which they rarely if ever think they are), they see themselves as unworthy, “lazy,” weak or just not good enough- And self love or acceptance is undeserved. That’s why many clients I see who have Trich and who generally also have this overly harsh, critical, perfectionistic attitude toward themselves tend to seek external validation since they are unable to give it to themselves. And this causes a pattern of people pleasing behaviors that also lead to living an inauthentic life, a life where one is not true to one’s self (since others’ opinions of their lives tend to be more important than their own.

Once my clients are able to access some of the painful feelings beneath the urges, and begin to experience greater self-acceptance and self love, two things happen: They begin to lead lives that are more authentic and true to themselves, and their urges to pull begin to diminish. And using mindfulness and learning to embrace gradual reduction rather than instant total cessation of pulling, they are able to slowly let go of some, most or all of tbeir hair pulling.

 

Various elements to my pulling

I have found that I pull for the following reasons/triggers

1)    GENETIC – because I have a trich disorder, it puts this idea in my head to pull out my hair. (I can resist this with a lot of self discipline)

2)    CHEMICAL – chemical imbalance – wrong foods cause incredible urges, which I basically find impossible to resist (thoughts of the kinky hair, the roots etc). This trigger is the worst for me, and the most difficult to control. That is why I love the JK diet so much (did _I_  say that?), not because it is easy, but it gave me back my life – it gave me a fighting chance against trich.

3)    SENSES (touch) – touching and isolating a specific hair…. course, kinky etc. Once I isolated a specific hair, it is very, very difficult to stop there. I fight this trigger by not allowing myself to touch my hair.

4)    SENSES (visual) – seeing black kinky hairs in a mirror. Once I see it, it chases me around the whole day – I cannot stop thinking about it. I combat this trigger by standing very far from mirrors and only using them when necessary.

5)    HABIT – I don’t believe trich is a habit at all, but after doing the same thing over and over for many years, there is definitely a habit element to it.  Using barriers such as band-aides, gloves, and bandanas have helped me stop unconscious pulling and also makes me more aware of my hands and their sneaky tendency to creep up to my face.  After studying my trich, I am more aware of my hands and usually catch myself before I ‘accidentally’ pull. Fiddle toys also help keep my hands busy.

6)    EMOTIONS – stress/pain/self hate etc. This often leads me to the unconscious or trance like pulling.  It is an escape from unpleasant feelings.  I have used trich to cope with emotions, good and bad for most of my life.  Learning to feel my feelings and being aware of my hands has helped with this.  After years of therapy and learning to rely on God, I have received emotional healing.  This has led me to break the vicious circle where… you pull, you hate yourself, worry about tomorrow (fixing the hair), and use negative self talk (ex. no one would like me anyway, I am worthless, I may just as well pull) so you pull, and you hate yourself etc… I have learned to avoid this negative thinking and stop myself when I head down that path.

7)     THE ITCH – nothing has been able to stop my head from itching yet, but denorex shampoo is very helpful.  I used to pull, thinking (unconsciously) that the pulling would stop the itching. (It doesn’t, don’t fall for that one!). Now I know that it won’t stop the itching, so even though my head itches, I’ll scratch, but I won’t pull (usually).  Head massagers, shampoo brushes, combs, and scalpicin help with the itch and keep my hands off my head.