Category Archives: Bipolar

Give Your Burden’s to God


Hope for Bipolar Depression

Even in our darkest places, we will eventually realize that there is hope to get through our tragedies and hardships. What may seem hopeless one day, will lead into another, that will assure us that depression does not last forever. When we are in the middle of it, we cannot see the light, but upon reflection, many realize that there is room to grow and learn from our experiences, no matter how bleak and dark. I know this to be true when attempting to fight off the darkness that never seems to end.

Depression is an element of bipolar disorder that we can never escape, but it is truly in reaching out for help that will bring us on a journey of recovery and acceptance that makes it okay to not be okay. It is imperative to know that clinical depression is not always triggered by something in particular, and there is often not a ‘reason’ for the experience. We are plainly dealing with a mental illness that often has no specific logical circumstantial indicator. As we travel through the valleys, we just have to remember than one day, we will once again soar into a place of stability and balance. Taking the first step by reaching out may be the most difficult, but it is also one of the most vital decisions that you will ever have to make.

Keep your heads up guys and know that you too are worthy of understanding, acceptance, and empathy. Never be afraid to ask for the help that you so rightfully deserve.

When God Doesn’t Move the Mountain

Why can’t I  stop pulling my hair?

Why do I still have manic episodes?

Why does this cloud of depression try to consume me?

 I know God can heal me. The creator of the universe can do anything. So I wonder, will He ever heal me? I pray and pray and try to fight through His strength. Some days are better than others, but the bottom line is that these strongholds are the anchors trying to drag me down.  I am the child of the one true King and nothing the devil throws at me will change my unwavering faith and love for my God, my Savior, and my closest Friend.

Through my most recent manic episode that lasted about four months, I have begged for healing.  Through my prayers and seeking God through His Word, I keep getting the same message.  There is a purpose for my pain. God will use me and my struggles in His time. I know His plans are perfect and He is preparing me for what lies ahead.

In 2 Corinthians, Paul talks about his disability. Paul is the guy with an insurmountable faith. He commanded people to be healed in the name of Jesus, and they were healed instantly. He told a demon to flee simply  because he was annoyed, and the demon fled. Paul clearly lacks no faith. He’s the guy that could say to a mountain, “move,” and it would have to move. He says:

“…I was given the gift of a handicap to keep me in constant touch with my limitations. Satan’s angel did his best to get me down; what he in fact did was push me to my knees. No danger then of walking around high and mighty! At first I didn’t think of it as a gift, and begged God to remove it. Three times I did that, and then He told me,

‘My grace is enough; it’s all you need. My strength comes into its own in your weakness.’

Once I heard that, I was glad to let it happen. I quit focusing on the handicap and began appreciating the gift.”  {2 Corinthians 12:7-12}

The poster child of faith could not pray his own disability away. Three times he prayed, using a level of faith that is hard to wrap my mind around…and God still said no. God wanted Paul to rely on His grace to make it through, not on Paul’s own ability. God wanted to bring Paul to his knees so that he would have to rely on Him to get by.

But sometimes God says no.

You don’t have to tell yourself that the faith you just tried so hard to muster up, so intensely that it made you physically sick, wasn’t enough. That if you could just try a little harder, you could make God change the situation. That you could somehow control God.

Because, surprisingly, it’s incredibly comforting to know that God can say no. And he does, often. There’s strength in knowing we can’t control His decisions, and that the outcome does not always, in fact, depend on our level of faith.

And there’s strength in knowing that sometimes God doesn’t move the mountains, simply because He wants us to rely on Him to climb them.

Never Let the Presence of a Storm Cause You to Doubt the Presence of God



God is always with us. Our hardest times are those times we need Him most. Learning to lean on Him during these storms is life changing. The hardest times in my life have actually been a blessing because they have radically changed my relationship with God. I now know I cannot make it through life without Him.

We are not built to be strong enough or good enough to do this life on our own. We are all created with a God size hole in our soul. There is only one Love, one Truth that can fill that yearning. He is the only way we can truly feel peace and joy. No amount of money, success, or fame can compare. All things of this world leave us feeling empty because we were designed to have a relationship with our creator.

I love my family and friends, but Jesus comes first. He is the only one who understands all of me. He knows my darkest secrets and deepest fears and He loves me because of the broken imperfect person I am.


In the Storm

God With Us

He’s with you through the pain. He comforts you in the waiting. When you’re anxious about your future, He gives you courage. As you climb the mountain, He keeps you safe in His arms. In every moment, we have God With Us. 🙏✝️❤️

Click the link to watch it now! 🔽

Life Church Sermon: In the Storm

Does Bipolar Disorder Run in Families? — The Bipolar Writer

I can trace Bipolar disorder in my family in at least three generations on my family tree. Two of my great aunts, a second cousin, first cousin on one side, and a first cousin on the Rhee side. My sister also suffer with bipolar 2 and trichotillomania just like me.

It’s interesting looking at my own tree, it feels like walking through a forest. Every tree is little bit different but they share parts of the same family. I have no idea if that made sense. I […]

via Does Bipolar Disorder Run in Families? — The Bipolar Writer

Suffering Produces Perseverance

I no longer wish I never had trich or bipolar disorder. Although both come full of pain and suffering, there is another side. Working through my struggles has made me the person I am today. I don’t know if I would have have the same faith, spirit of perseverance, or compassion. I think my best traits have been developed through my pain. God did not cause my suffering, but He will use it for good.

I still hope to be pull free, but I am happy now as I am. My moods are relatively stable and I have settled on a set of meds that works for me. I still pull, but it does not rule my life. Yes, I do spend a considerable amount of time practicing awareness and coping strategies. However, I do not feel like less of a person because I do this or because I am missing some hair. Everyone has some form of struggle in their life. Learning to use that suffering for good is the key to moving through it and finding a purpose for your pain. I read this devotional earlier today and thought that it lined up so well with the verse that has been on my heart, Romans 5:3-4.

Your Pain Often Reveals God’s Purpose for You


Your pain often reveals God’s purpose for you. God never wastes a hurt! If you’ve gone through a hurt, he wants you to help other people going through that same hurt. He wants you to share it. God can use the problems in your life to give you a ministry to others. In fact, the very thing you’re most ashamed of in your life and resent the most could become your greatest ministry in helping other people.
Who can better help somebody going through a bankruptcy than somebody who went through a bankruptcy? Who can better help somebody struggling with an addiction than somebody who’s struggled with an addiction? Who can better help parents of a special needs child than parents who raised a special needs child? Who can better help somebody who’s lost a child than somebody who lost a child?
The very thing you hate the most in your life is what God wants to use for good in your life.
The Bible says in 2 Corinthians 1, verses 4 and 6, “God comforts us in all our troubles so that we can comfort others. When we are weighed down with troubles, it is for your comfort and salvation! For when we ourselves are comforted, we will certainly comfort you. Then you can patiently endure the same things” (NLT).
This is called redemptive suffering. Redemptive suffering is when you go through a problem or a pain for the benefit of others.
This is what Jesus did. When Jesus died on the cross, he didn’t deserve to die. He went through that pain for your benefit so that you can be saved and go to Heaven.
There are many different causes for the problems, pains, and suffering in your life. Sometimes the stuff that happens you bring on yourself. When you make stupid decisions, then it causes pain in your life. If you go out and overspend and buy things you can’t afford and presume on the future, and then you go deeply in debt and lose your house, you can’t say, “God, why did you let me lose my house?” You can’t blame God for your bad choices.
But in some of your problems, you’re innocent. You’ve been hurt by the pain, stupidity, and sins of other people. And some of the pain in your life is for redemptive suffering. God often allows us to go through a problem so that we can then help others.

Bipolar Resources

Along my journey with bipolar disorder I have had many questions. Several books have helped me immensely. My all time favorite, most used book is The Bipolar Survival Guide , by David J. Wolfowitz. I have included a thorough summary of this book.



David J. Miklowitz

The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide
(New York: Guilford, 2002), 322 pages.

One problem with self-help books is that few people actually do what the books prescribe. To put all this advice into practice would be a full-time job! Most readers settle for a few snacks rather than the entire meal. This tendency is exaggerated with those who exhibit symptoms of bipolar disorder because they aren’t persuaded that they even have a problem. They are not inclined to invest in the process of change when they do not see that change is needed. They think that the real problem is the other people who have low tolerance for the more energetic and creative moments of their bipolar flights. And they certainly do not see the need for hospitalization.

The basic premise of the book is this: “knowledge is power.” The more you understand about the problem, the more you will be able to accept it and manage it. It reviews the symptoms, possible causes, traditional treatments, and self-management strategies.

The book begins with vignettes from the lives of people who have experienced the highs and lows of bipolar. For readers who have rarely, if ever, witnessed bipolar, such stories create an opportunity to accumulate vicarious experience.

From there, Miklowitz presents a few chapters on the traditional psychiatric perspective regarding bipolar disorder: this is a biological problem—an illness—and only a combination of medication and counseling will help.

Bipolar people do have unique disabilities. They rarely believe that they have a problem, and that alone can make them insufferable to family and friends. The traditional view emphasizes medication, in part, because it seems to inject clarity and protection into an otherwise destructive .

Miklowitz’s explanation of bipolar is that a genetic predisposition can be latent until provoked by difficult life circumstances and/or by unhelpful interpretations the person makes. Therefore, the pillars of this treatment plan include (1) medication, (2) changing the environment, and (3) changing how one thinks.

His thoughts on medication are predictable: medication is essential, and a bipolar person will probably take it for life. He suggests that medication can extend the length of time between recurrences. If there are recurrences, medication limits the extremes of the highs and lows.

Regarding changes in environment and lifestyle, he includes the following suggestions:

  • Avoid all drugs and alcohol.
  • Deal quickly with conflicts.
  • Stick to a wise schedule. Opt for as much sameness and predictability in life as possible. For example, go to bed and rise at the same times and avoid allnighters. There is some reason to think that significant and rapid changes to the routines of life can trigger those vulnerable to bipolar highs and lows.

His psychotherapeutic component focuses on present problems more than past history and addresses these questions:

  • How does bipolar affect your work and relationships?
  • Have you identified early warning signs?
  • Do you know how to grow in your relationships?
  • How have you handled the possibility of future bipolar fluctuations in your life?

The author gives practical suggestions for identifying early warning signs and assembling a team of persons who can help. He advises that whenever the bipolar person notices connections between early behavioral changes and later bipolar highs, he (or the counselor) should write these down, then date the paper and sign it. If, during more stable periods, the bipolar person acknowledges that certain steps would be wise to follow during the highs, he or the counselor should write these down as well. These steps could include taking away (or giving up) car keys and credit cards as a means to limit the damage done by impulsive decisions.

By Ed Welsh