Category Archives: Monthly Progress

Small Victories

I made it 10 days without pulling my hair!

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We are often hardest on ourselves so after pulling a few hairs, I’m giving myself the same advice I would offer another trichsters who stopped pulling for any length of time and then pull again.

Don’t stop celebrating that victory just because you slipped up.

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Although it seems like all that work was for nothing, it’s not in vain. Every time you resisted the urge to pull was a small victory, another step closer to recovery. You are building strength and training yourself not to pull.

It’s a long hard process, but you’ve already done a lot of the work. You are learning ways to be aware and self-sooth without pulling. It didn’t start overnight so it will also take time to fully stop. Next time it will be that much easier. 💜

 

Steps to Recovery

The Path to Recovery: An Overview and Reminder

I believe the path to hair pulling and skin picking recovery includes the following steps:

1) Learn to accept & love yourself whether you’re pulling or not If you withhold self-acceptance until you have complete recovery you create a battle ground within yourself. (Read Radical Acceptance by Tara Brach.) This is NOT the same as giving up, or accepting the pulling will never change. This is accepting yourself, regardless of whether you are still pulling or picking; not making your self love conditional.

2) Keep a calendar and rate each day from 0 to 10, 0 being 0 pulling or picking, 10 being your worst day. This will be your “scale” so that you can see improvement, even if you can’t see it on your head, face or body. If one month has 9s, 8s and 7s, and the next has 8s, 6s and 4s, you may not see a physical change yet, but you are on your way. This helps when you have a bad day. My blog at HelpForHairPullers.blogspot.com will expand on this.

3) People always ask, Is there a substitute for pulling or picking? Something I can do with my hands? I say, the real substitute is something you do with your MIND. If you usually go go go all day, and then suddenly sit down to watch a movie, get on the computer, read, and find yourself pulling or picking, then pulling is aiding you in the transition from doing to not-doing. Instead of trying to fight the pulling, you want to adopt a nightly ritual that will help the body release stress Before you sit down to read, watch TV, et al. I suggest before you sit down with a book or TV, SIT for FIVE minutes and either do a relaxation exercise (inhale relaxation, exhale stress, tension & tightness) or do a mindfulness meditation for five minutes. Your mind & body then get a chance to make the transition into a state of relaxation. Your urges will begin to lessen as you do this since you’ve already addressed one of the reasons you have urges.

4) Bring awareness to your conscious mind: I once worked with a 60-ish woman who had a severe cuticle picking problem. It was so bad her hands were bloody and nicked, and she was deeply ashamed. I asked her if she did this all day or at specific times. Oh it’s always the same, she said. I sit down at 5pm for an hour before my husband comes home and read the paper and have a glass of wine. That’s when I pull. So I asked her, Do you think about it before you sit down? Do you bring to mind the fact that this a dangerous time for you? She said she did not. “I guess I don’t want to think about it because I’m always hoping that I won’t do it.” When I asked her if there was ever a time in the past 35 years that she didn’t pick, she said no. I explained that what she called “hope,” I called denial. I urged her to simply acknowledge to herself before she sat down that this was a danger time for her, and it was important to be aware. This often is not always enough to make a change, but for this woman, acknowledging to herself before hand that this was a dangerous time for her allowed her to stop picking entirely.   For other people it is one small piece in the bigger puzzle of trich and CSP recovery.

5) Until you understand & accept that recovery is a gradual process, you are unlikely to be able to recover long term. Pullers and pickers often proudly tell me they are perfectionists. Here’s the problem. If you are perfectionist, you are, by definition, a failure. Humans are not perfect, cannot be. So if you set a standard for yourself that is unattainable, you will always feel bad about yourself. The reason I suggest using a daily number (#2 above) is because recovery is generally a two steps forward, one step back kind of thing. The reason it’s so tough to recover from these disorders is that it’s quite common to have a “bad day” after having several good ones. And it’s just as common to think to yourself, “Oh boy, I ruined everything. Here I was doing well, and now I’ve messed it up. I guess I’ll NEVER recover, so I MIGHT AS WELL JUST PULL (or pick). That voice–the one that tells you that you’ll “never” recover? That’s the trich or CSP addiction talking. Think about it. If you tell yourself that you’ll “never recover,” you’re free to pull or pick! If you are a perfectionist about this, you are saying that either you suddenly stop and stay stopped 100% or you are a failure. Since that’s unlikely to happen, you in fact have now made it impossible to recover. What if, in order to get to zero, you have to achieve less and less pulling first? You might say, I did so well for three weeks, and I “ruined” everything all in one day. NOPE, not true, that’s impossible in fact. If you pulled very little or none for three weeks, and had one bad day, that means 21 of 22 days were good or even great. This is a huge improvement. And yes, I understand that you pulled out a bunch of hair and picked a bunch of skin. However, you didn’t “ruin” your progress. The more days you have where you pull less, the faster overall you’ll grow back your hair or heal up your skin.

6) Change your short-term goal. If your goal is to have your hair back or to have your skin clear, that’s always six months in the future. Your short term goal must be to feel good about yourself for improving and to validate yourself for any gains made, including gains made in awareness and self-talk, as opposed to lessening of the behavior. If you often say, I was so “good” for a while; now I’ve “messed” things up again. I have so little hair, or my skin is so messed up, “what’s the point” in trying to stop now. I look terrible anyway (and I’ll probably just pull or pick tomorrow). Here’s the POINT: You will feel better about yourself later if you pull even a little bit less right now. And if you don’t, you can learn to celebrate small victories.  You have to admit you will probably feel bad if you continue to pick or to pull. So at the very least you are avoiding that. The POINT is, recovery is gradual. The hair and the clear skin come later: the small steps happen now. The POINT is, taking any step, however small, is a step toward recovery.  This is a great point! The POINT is, Hey, even though I tried to tell myself that my hair is so messed up I might as well pull, I did NOT pull. Each day that goes on, and that you pull a little less, is another day that you can remind yourself, hey, I’m doing this. I’m making small steps these will add up. Good for ME! And every day you are able to pull or pick the smallest bit less, you are closer to the long term goals around hair or skin.

Changing the way you look at this so you understand it is not your fault that you have trich (but like any other disorder you could have, it’s your responsibility to yourself to address it), encouraging and supporting yourself as you recover, becoming more mindful, taking five minutes before those transition times to relax your body and mind, keeping track of the days with a single number (so you can look back and see that, hey, overall the numbers are getting lower), and accepting yourself no matter what, these are all important pieces on the path to recovery. Everyone can get there. Congratulations. You are on the path.

Healthy Living in God Centered Life, Heart, and Home is my Key to Healing and Peace from all My Struggles

This past week has been very hard for me. I am bipolar. My postpartum hormones and inability to take mood stabilizers while breast feeding has made this last year challenging.

I was determined to keep a balanced mind and hopeful outlook, even though I was rapidly see-sawing from extreme depression, to numbness, to high anxiety and a racing mind.

I have been fighting a mania for  a few months now. It got worse in the beginning of April when both my van and my husband’s car broke down on the same day. The added stress of this caused a major fight between my husband and I. My anxiety escalated exponentially and I could’t sleep.

If I don’t get an average of 7-8 hours of sleep per night, I start to become manic. I can feel it coming on and usually try to get a few long nights of sleep. This generally brings me back to earth.

Unfortunately last Tuesday the insomnia and anxiety ramped up even further due in part to PMDD. I have been fighting it, but I keep spiraling further into a full blown manic episode.

My family is concerned and I am nervous too. God is helping me stay in touch with reality, but completing ever day tasks as a SAHM of 4 is overwhelming to say the least. I need help and I have learned to reach out. My family is amazing!! I would be lost without their unconditional love and support.  My husband, parents, and sisters have helped with the kids.

I am using all the tools I learned in therapy to cope and level out. However, they are not cutting it this time. I need a psychiatrist and some medication. My former doctor retired and I could not find anyone who takes my insurance for the past year. Finally, an office I formerly attended had an opening. I got an appointment, but it was a month out from when the mania really amped up in April. I am now much worse and I still have to wait a week for the doctor. 

I am scared and trying to get in earlier, but I don’t know if that’s possible. I am clinging to God right now and he is giving me peace. My daily devotional spoke especially true to my heart today and I felt the need to share here. My God is my rock, my refuge in the storm. He is my healer and the maker of heaven and earth. I know He will not give me more than I can bear, so he must think I’m awefully strong.  I am not sure what he is preparing me for.  I feel once I overcome this, I will do great things in His name. He can do anything and I am continuing to pray for complete healing from bipolar disorder and trich.

To end on positive not, my pulling has significantly decreased over the last two weeks. I did not pull at all for the last two days and have also had several good days. This comes after a year of bad pulling so it is such a relief. The urge is lower and I am more aware. Fingers crossed.

***UPDATE***

May 21, 2016

After meeting with my new doctor, I started the same medication regimen I had in the past. It has been over 3 years since I have regularly taken medication; I have had 2 babies close together. I became pregnant unexpectedly with my third child in February 2013, and again in August 2014…so I have been off medication since February 2013 (3+ years 😳).

I stayed remarkably well balanced, but recently my mania has been impending. I am fighting it, but it’s slowly overtaking me. I do see the light at the end of the tunnel and I am continually giving my struggles to God because he can fight for me much better than I ever could. I have peace in His love, omnipotent, and omnipresent ways. ❤️🙏💐🌈🚇⛅️😊

How to Help Your Family Grow
By Rick Warren

“Since I … have washed your feet, you ought to wash each other’s feet. I have given you an example to follow. Do as I have done to you” (John 13:14-15 NLT, second edition).

If one of the marks of an awesome family is that we help each other grow, how do you do that?

Let me give you two ways that help people grow and two ways that don’t. This applies in every area of life.

Help each other grow:

1. Through example. Jesus did this in teaching the disciples. John 13:14-15 says,“Since I … have washed your feet, you ought to wash each other’s feet. I have given you an example to follow. Do as I have done to you” (NLT, second edition).Your kids don’t want to hear a sermon. They want to see Jesus’ example in your life.

2. Through conversations. If you’re not having critical conversations with your kids about real issues, they’re not growing. Unfortunately most conversations we have with kids are about schedule, eating, or homework and not about the stuff that really matters in life.

The Bible says in Deuteronomy 6:7, “You must teach [God’s commandments] to your children and talk about them when you are at home or out for a walk; at bedtime and the first thing in the morning” (TLB).

Now let me tell you two ways that don’t work to help people grow:

1. Through criticism. Nagging doesn’t work. Condemning doesn’t work. Criticizing and complaining are totally ineffective in helping a person change. Why? Because when you criticize, you’re focusing on what you don’t want rather than what you do want.

Ephesians 6:4 says, “Don’t keep on scolding and nagging your children, making them angry and resentful. Rather, bring them up with the loving discipline the Lord himself approves, with suggestions and godly advice.”

2. Through comparing. Everybody’s unique. There’s nobody in the world like you! That’s why comparing never, ever works. In fact it’s lethal to any relationship. The Bible says, “Each person should judge his own actions and not compare himself with others. Then he can be proud for what he himself has done” (Galatians 6:4 NCV).

Your Outlook is Key

IT IS IMPORTANT TO LOOK AT YOUR OVERALL PULLING TREND RATHER THAN THE # OF PULL FREE DAYS.  IF PULL FREE IS YOUR FOCUS ONE BAD DAY COULD BRING YOU DOWN, BUT IF YOU LOOK AT THE BIG PICTURE, THEN YOU CAN PUT THAT ONE BAD DAY IN PERSPECTIVE WITH ALL OF THE GOOD DAYS.  I HAVE BEEN RATING MY PULLING BASED ON THE SYSTEM CLAUDIA MILES DESCRIBES IN THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE.

You CAN Recover From Hair Pulling in 2016: Here is How

There’s all this talk about CBT therapy being the “most” effective. I agree more with the “C” (cognitive) part than the “B” part (behavioral). The bottom line is, if you don’t change the way you look at hair pulling* (*applies to skin picking throughout) there is no lasting recovery. Just today someone told me, “I was doing better and having lower numbers* for several months. Then I started pulling more and more and felt hopeless, and now I’m back where I was.” (*Earlier in this blog I suggest people write down ONE number every day re their pulling or picking. Rate your pulling from 0 to 10, 0 being zero pulling, 10 being your worst day. That will be your “scale.” That will be the one and only way you know you are recovering. NOT the hair on your head or lashes or brows. JUST the numbers. And the goal is to move from month to month having overall lower numbers with the understanding that you will have some bad days and that real success is accepting those and moving on.)

The person above who did better for a while and then had some bad days and felt hopeless again and gave up, her story embodies all our stories. Whether the length of time you’ve done better is a few months, a few weeks, a few days, a few hours or a few minutes, and the return to increased pulling is a moment, a day or a week, that step backwards is everyone’s undoing. It was my story when I was pulling. Unless you can live through that moment and know it’s part of the process, CBT or meditation or any other method will fail You. Because recovery is, will be, two steps forward, one step back. It will be three steps forward, two steps back. It may be eight steps forward, five steps back. You have not “gone backward,” you have not “undone your progress.” Because progress won’t show on your head or your face (lashes, brows, skin) until later. Until you’ve done well, had that bad day or two, put it into context (the addiction trying to trick you into hopelessness so you will pull or pick), accepted it, checked not your hair or face right then but rather the general improvement in overall numbers, you CAN NOT RECOVER. Once you can see that those bad days will come and not let them deter you, your recovery is ASSURED.

Prepare for that. Because as you learn to live without the comfort of pulling to turn to, the part of your psyche where your addiction is lodged, will get scared. For food addicts it is scary not to have comfort food to turn to. And that fear will inevitably cause, urge, cajole and tempt you to binge on something in the midst of changing over to healthy eating and moderation. With pulling that fear will cause you to have a few binge pulling days. And if at that time you say, “Forget it. I can’t do this. I messed up. I failed, I’ll never lose the weight,” YOU WILL GIVE UP. You will say, as we all have, what’s the point? It doesn’t matter. I’ve ruined it.

Ah but you have not. Because you won’t stop suddenly and completely. You’ll stop gradually. And you’ll have bad days in there. And if you learn not to judge them or panic or tell yourself, SEE I have failed, THEN you will have succeeded. Eventually you won’t have to have those bad days. But the problem isn’t those bad days. It’s allowing those INEVITABLE bad days to stop you.

Because this will take a year. A year on the path. And then your hair will grow back. Your skin will heal. And if you demand this take three months, well it just won’t happen at all. I know a year is a long time. But so is FOREVER. Do you want to pull one more year or forever?

During this year your motivation simply cannot be about how you look or your hair growing in but about feeling good about yourself. About feeling whole. Saying “fuck it I’m ugly” is the addiction talking. Saying “there is no point” is the addiction talking. Saying “I don’t care” is the addiction talking.

The only way to avoid that is to understand that at the beginning you must focus on feeling good or at least better about yourself because you are working on the pulling. And writing down a number every day and focusing on improving the numbers and seeing them get lower each month that goes by, will keep you motivated. Knowing that you could feel proud the next day or next week is motivation. Knowing that judging yourself along the way is simply the addiction talking will keep you motivated.

It is NOT YOUR FAULT you have Trich or skin picking disorder. But it is your responsibility to face it. When you say, “I don’t care” to give yourself temporary permission to pull you are lying to yourself. Of course you care. That doesn’t mean you can always stop in that moment but you care. Pulling for all intents and purposes is an addiction. And you are a slave to it. So care about THAT. It’s NOT, I am bad, what’s wrong with me, it’s more, This is costing me a lot and is keeping you from living the life you want. That’s why I care.

Above all else do not beat yourself up. Do not ask yourself WHY over and over again or What is wrong with me??. (Answer: Because you have trich or CSP. There is no other reason.)

One cannot recover without shifting the center of motivation from hair to how I feel about myself, how this affects my life. Because the hair takes time to grow. If it’s about the hair everyone fails. Because it’s too easy to say that, well it looks like shit now so I may as well pull.

That is pretty much why people can’t recover: Well my hair or lashes and brows or face looks like shit anyway (thus there will be no immediate payoff) so I might as well pull.

Imagine a person who weighs 350 lbs trying to lose weight. All they have is the scale to help them to see they are losing weight. They can’t see it on their body right away. All you’ll have for now is those numbers going down. This person who weighs 350 lbs must be proud that they are undertaking the journey. No new clothes shopping now perhaps. Maybe they don’t feel pretty. But they are achieving a goal. Of lower numbers on the scale. And they can and must feel good about in order to keep going.

At the end of this thing you will have your hair. But at first make it your business to have lower numbers one month to the next and prepare for those inevitable bad days and they need not take you down.

I KNOW that you can recover from pulling. And believe me, I never thought I could either. But now I know different. The only substitute for pulling is self-acceptance and self-love, self-care and setting boundaries. Read Radical Acceptance. Read Codependent No More. And since it should be said, Take a day or night off just for you.  Exercise. Eat healthy good. Sleep well. Say NO once in a while.  Don’t remain friends with people who are takers. Don’t wait till you stop pulling to live life and to enjoy life. I’ll be happy to answer questions here if you have them.

 

Claudia Miles

The Bipolar Coaster

i_m__fine__by_banditmaster721-d9ij7hv

My bipolar roller coaster in a nutshell …. I’m just holding on tight, enjoying the ride, and doing my best to level out. I am way better than a few years ago, but I still have ups and downs. My super talkative, productive hypomanic self is coming out right now. I know it freaks out a lot of people who know me and think I am not acting like myself. I am thankful I am in touch with reality and have realized what is happening. It is a welcome change from the overwhelmingly gloomy and exhausting postpartum depression I have been in for the last 10 months. To anyone with a mental illness, I empathize with your struggle. Although each of us suffers in our own way, we have similar feelings.

The Bipolar Disorder Definition of “I’m Fine”

Gabe Howard

Social etiquette is an important thing for society, and that includes such things as asking, “How are you?” when we greet others. As a person with disorder, I dont’t have any special exemption from answering that question in any way other than, “Fine”.

There are three main moods that most people with bipolar will experience at any given time: bipolar mania, baseline, and depression.  As we all know, “fine” can mean different things, based on our moods. Here are my truthful answers based on each of those moods.

Bipolar Mania: How Are You?  

When I am manic (not very happy, not excited, not hypomanic), there is only one truly honest answer to the question: “I am a god from the planet Awesome. I’m better than you. And I can shoot happiness from my eyes into your soul.”

Then, over the next five minutes, in dramatic and rapid fashion, I will tell you my amazing plans. I’ll tell you how to fix everything wrong with the world, and what incredible, exceptional, and amazing rock-star caliber thing I am getting ready to do. At some point, I will forget what I’m talking about and rush off to do said rock-star caliber thing and — who knows? — I may actually succeed.

I will make no sense, but trust me when I say you’ll love it – and me – right up until it goes horribly wrong. That generally happens around the next morning, long after everyone has gone home.

Bipolar Depression: How Are You?

The more depressed I am, the less likely you are to get any answer at all, both because I simply won’t have the energy and because I’ll be holed up alone somewhere away from your ability to ask. But, if we did come into contact and I did have the energy to answer, I would tell you I feel nothing.

Describing “nothing” is difficult and confusing. There is no analogy that is truly fitting. It can’t be described as the absence of something, much in the same way describing darkness as the lack of light doesn’t really help someone understand.

Specifically, I say: “I have no energy. I have no desires. If I were to die right here, right now, I wouldn’t care, mainly because I lack the motivation to care one way or the other. I feel nothing for myself. I feel empty, as does the world around me. I feel abandoned, alone, and broken. I have no belief in future happiness, nor any recollection of happy times in the past. And all this seems perfectly normal to me.”

Bipolar Baseline: How Are You?

Depression and mania are symptoms that anyone with bipolar disorder has experienced to some extent. However, living in recovery, which is the goal, means I spend most of my time in the middle. My moods still exist on a spectrum, but the spectrum is a lot narrower. My depression is manageable and I’m able to continue moving forward, even if at a slower pace.

I am still excitable, but mania is almost completely wiped out. I function, day to day, pretty much the same as everyone else, just with a chronic health condition to manage. This takes work, but life for most people takes effort. This is just my lot.

So when someone asks how I am, you might be surprised to know that the answer, nine times out of ten, is “traumatized.” My exact answer would be:

“I’m scared, worried, and I know that I’m going to get sick again and be left alone or be a burden to my loved ones. The emptiness I’ve felt, the suicidal feelings, the loss, the abandonment, and the failure are still living inside me. Since the illness is still with me – albeit controlled – the potential for it to come back and torture me again is very real. And that terrifies me.”

The reality is that my daily life is hard because I have to move forward with the trauma of my past weighing me down. I am scared of ending up back where I started. I’m scared of losing everything. I’m scared of hurting myself or others emotionally. I’m scared of making my granny cry again.

So that’s why I answer, “Fine.” It’s the easy answer. But never has a little word carried so much hidden meaning.

Please Note: Gabe is writing a book about a regular guy living with bipolar and needs your support. Pre-orders available and much more. Check it out by clicking here.

blogs.psychcentral.com ·

 

July’s Progress

After looking over my progress chart for the month I see less good days, more ok days, and less bad days then June.  Although I wish there had been more good days, I am relieved that there were only 3 bad days (and those were only 7’s, which is my ‘best’ bad day).  No 8,9, or 10’s is reassuring because those days are really hard to come back from both mentally and in the amount of damage I do to my hair.  I have some new growth up top, but it’s aggravating how slow it’s coming in.  I’m taking biotin to support growth, but my poor follicles are so damaged.The curly girl method has helped with my dry hair and scalp so maybe that will be good for my follicles..hopefully.

I’ve included my progress over the last 3 months for a comparison.

May’s monthly totals:
Score 0 1 2 3 – 4 5 6 – 7 8 9 10
# of Days 1 2 2 18 -1 3 4 – 0 0 0 0
Good = 23 Ok = 8 Bad = 0

June’s monthly totals:
Score 0 1 2 3 – 4 5 6 – 7 8 9 10
# of Days 0 1 0 11 – 5 4 3 – 4 2 0 0
Good = 12 Ok = 12 Bad = 6

July’s monthly totals:
Score 0 1 2 3 – 4 5 6 – 7 8 9 10
# of Days 3 1 1 4 – 7 7 5 – 3 0 0 0
Good = 9 Ok = 19 Bad = 3

May & June

I am behind on posting my progress, but at least I have been charting.  This is the longest I have every diligently tallied my pulling.  In the past, I always gave up after a couple months, usually when my pulling got worse and I couldn’t face the numbers.  I have learned that charting increases my awareness of my pulling and my triggers.  I have made a goal to chart continually, as I believe this is a major factor in my recovery.

My goal for May was to have more good days than I did in March.  My March totals were 17 good days and 14 bad day.  I met my goal!  This feels great, especially after not meeting my goal for April.  Looking at June, I did not do as well.  With a newborn, sleep deprivation, and use of caffeine I can see why I did worse.  I know these circumstances are only temporary, so I am going to continue to do my best.  I know things will improve once I get more sleep and go back to faithfully following the John Kender Diet.

May’s monthly totals:
Score 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# of Days 1 2 2 18 1 3 4 0 0 0 0
Good = 23 Ok = 8 Bad = 0

June’s monthly totals:
Score 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# of Days 0 1 0 11 5 4 3 4 2 0 0
Good = 12 Ok = 12 Bad = 6

April’s Totals

My goal for April was to have more good days than I did in March.  My March totals were 17 good days and 14 bad day.  As my chart shows, I did not reach my April goal.  I did however have a relatively good month compared to the 5 months prior to March.  I hoping for a better outcome for May, which is looking good.  So far I have 8 good days and 1 bad day, so I’m hoping to keep up that pattern.  I’m carrying my April goal over to May and am aiming to have more good days in May than I did in March (at least 18)…I’m almost halfway there!

April’s monthly totals:

Score 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# of Days 0 2 4 6 1 7 3 7 0 0 0
Good = 12 Bad = 18

One Month

The last few days have been rocky.  My daily scores for the last week in March were

0

0

6 (coffee in the AM)

8

1 (eggs in the AM)

2

8 (thanks eggs…now I remember why I need to ditch the yokes)

I see a definite connection in my bad days and the bad foods I ate preceding the pulling.  The longer I keep a food journal the more of these patterns I see.  It reaffirms my commitment to the John Kender diet.  It is a tough diet to stick to, but it is worth the benefits.  It’s been 8 months since I began following the John Kender diet and using a food journal.  In that time I have learned what causes pulling (for me) and how long it takes to affect me and wear off.  I have learned what I can eat, but am still looking to increase my options.    There are so many specialty cookbooks for different diets, but unfortunately no one has made a John Kender diet cookbook…I’ve looked.  I’m working to create my own collection of recipes and meals that are good for us trichsters.

This month  my goal was to have more good days than bad days in regards to my pulling.  I use Claudia Mile’s recommendation to rate my pulling from 0-10 each day.  The rubric I created to rate my pulling is below. I defined good days as 0-3.  I have accomplished my goal of more good days than bad.  My goal for April is to have more good days than I did in March.

This month’s totals:

Score 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
# of Days 8 1 7 1 1 1 1 5 4 1 1
Good = 17 Bad = 14
Score #Pulled Rules Broken Time Spent Pulling Areas pulled From
0 0 0 0 0
1 1-3 1
2 4-10 1 <5min
3 <20 2
4 20-30 2 <15min
5 30-40
6 40-60 3 <30min 3
7 60-80
8 80-100 4 ~1 Hour
9 100+
10 Way too many to count 5 >1